James: Truth Is a Property of Certain of Our Ideas

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“Truth, as any dictionary will tell you, is a property of certain of our ideas. It means their ‘agreement,’ as falsity means their disagreement, with ‘reality.’ Pragmatists and intellectualists both accept this definition as a matter of course. They begin to quarrel only after the question is raised as to what may precisely be meant by the term ‘agreement,’ and what by the term ‘reality,’ when reality is taken as something for our ideas to agree with.” (p. 166) #James #truth #idea

James, William, Pragmatism. A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking 1907.

James: Truth

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“The truth of an idea is not a stagnant property inherent in it. Truth HAPPENS to an idea. It BECOMES true, is MADE true by events. Its verity is in fact an event, a process: the process namely of its verifying itself, its veri-FICATION. Its validity is the process of its valid-ATION.” (p. 169) #James #truth #veri-FICATION #valid-ATION

James, William, Pragmatism. A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking 1907.

James: True Ideas

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“The moment pragmatism asks this question, it sees the answer: TRUE IDEAS ARE THOSE THAT WE CAN ASSIMILATE, VALIDATE, CORROBORATE AND VERIFY. FALSE IDEAS ARE THOSE THAT WE CANNOT. That is the practical difference it makes to us to have true ideas; that, therefore, is the meaning of truth, for it is all that truth is known-as.” (p. 168f.) #James #TrueIdeas #truth

James, William, Pragmatism. A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking 1907.

James: Time

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“We assume for certain purposes one ‘objective’ Time that AEQUABILITER FLUIT, but we don’t livingly believe in or realize any such equally-flowing time.” (p. 148) #James #time

James, William, Pragmatism. A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking 1907.

James: Theories

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“THEORIES THUS BECOME INSTRUMENTS, NOT ANSWERS TO ENIGMAS, IN WHICH WE CAN REST. We don’t lie back upon them, we move forward, and, on occasion, make nature over again by their aid. Pragmatism unstiffens all our theories, limbers them up and sets each one at work. Being nothing essentially new, it harmonizes with many ancient philosophic tendencies. It agrees with nominalism for instance, in always appealing to particulars; with utilitarianism in emphasizing practical aspects; with positivism in its disdain for verbal solutions, useless questions, and metaphysical abstractions.” (p. 48) #James #theories

James, William, Pragmatism. A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking 1907.