Russell: The Church

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“[I]t [ie. the church] has chosen to label as morality a certain narrow set of rules of conduct which have nothing to do with human happiness“. (p. 32) #Russell #church

Russell, Bertrand, Why I Am Not a Christian: Rationalist Press Association Limited 1927.

Russell: Good World

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“A good world needs knowledge, kindliness, and courage; it does not need a regretful hankering after the past or a fettering of the free intelligence by the words uttered long ago by ignorant men. It needs a fearless outlook and a free intelligence. It needs hope for the future, not looking back all the time toward a past that is dead, which we trust will be far surpassed by the future that our intelligence can create.“ (p. 35) #Russell #GoodWorld

Russell, Bertrand, Why I Am Not a Christian: Rationalist Press Association Limited 1927.

Russell: Freedom of Mind

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“The mind which has become accustomed to the freedom and impartiality of philosophic contemplation will preserve something of the same freedom and impartiality in the world of action and emotion.” (Chap. XV) #Russell #FreedomOfMind

Russell, Bertrand, The Problems of Philosophy. London: Williams and Norgate 1912.

Russell: Pure Mathematics

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“We start, in pure mathematics, from certain rules of inference, by which we can infer that if one proposition is true, then so is some other proposition. These rules of inference constitute the major part of the principles of formal logic.” (p. 115) #Russell #mathematics #inference #logic

Russell, Bertrand, Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays. London: George Allen & Unwin LTD 111959.

Russell: Certain Knowledge

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“Is there any knowledge in the world which is so certain that no reasonable man could doubt it? This question, which at first sight might not seem difficult, is really one of the most difficult that can be asked. When we have realized the obstacles in the way of a straightforward and confident answer, we shall be well launched on the study of philosophy–for philosophy is merely the attempt to answer such ultimate questions, not carelessly and dogmatically, as we do in ordinary life and even in the sciences, but critically, after exploring all that makes such questions puzzling, and after realizing all the vagueness and confusion that underlie our ordinary ideas.” (Chap. I) #Russell #knowledge #ideas

Russell, Bertrand, The Problems of Philosophy. London: Williams and Norgate 1912.